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Men Only Test
Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea test
 

What is the men only test?
This is confidential test specifically for men who have sex with men. It includes a urine test for genital chlamydia and genital gonorrhoea, a rectal swab for chlamydia and gonorrhoea and a throat swab for gonorrhoea.

 

What will I need to do?
You will need to urinate into a pot and provide a sample using a swab (like a cotton ear bud). Please feel free to call us in you need further clarification.

 

What do you test for?
The test is for the most common STDs (Sexually Transmitted Diseases) including Chlamydia and Gonnorhea. You can read a lot more about Chlamydia and Gonnorhea at the bottom of this page in the more information section.

 

What is Chlamydia and how do I get it?
Chlamydia is a bacterial infection most commonly passed on by sexual activity (oral and anal sex).

Rates of Chlamydia have increased substantially in the last ten years. In 2009, about 4,500 gay men were treated for Chlamydia at sexual health clinics in the UK.

 

What is Gonnorhea and how do people catch it?
Gonorrhoea, or 'the clap', is a bacterial infection of the urethra, rectum, throat or eyes. It can be passed on by sexual activity (oral and anal) without a condom. Rates of gonorrhoea amongst gay men had remained fairly steady over the last ten years but increased dramatically in 2010, when just under 5,000 gay men were treated for gonorrhoea at sexual health clinics in the UK.

 

How do I know I've got Chlamydia?
It is important to realise that Chlamydia may not produce any symptoms at all. As such it is always wise to get tested if you are sexually active. However, one to six weeks after being infected, Chlamydia can cause a yellowy white discharge from your penis or, more rarely, from your anus or throat - the three most common places to catch it. You may also have pain when passing urine and an urge to pass urine more frequently than usual.

Many infected men don't show any symptoms at all, but are still infectious, so they can pass it on to other sexual partners without knowing it.

 

How do I know I've got Gonnorhea?
It is important to note that sometimes there are no symptoms at all so it is always wise to get tested if you are sexually active. However, noticeable symptoms can include a white or greenish pus discharge from your penis and a burning sensation when you pass urine or ejaculate. An infection in your anus may be noticeable by a yellowish discharge, mild diarrhoea, or itching and pain when you evacuate your bowels. An infection in your mouth can result in a sore throat.

Some symptoms include:

  • An unusual discharge from the tip of the penis, which may be white, yellow or green
  • Pain or a burning sensation when urinating
  • Swelling of the foreskin
  • Pain or tenderness in the testicles or prostate gland (this is rare)

At Convenience Medical you can test for chlamydia andgonorrhoea from the privacy of your own home with our confidential and discreet home test. The home test kit contains a pot for your urine sample and swab for your throat, and another for your anus which will be sent off to our partner laboratory for testing.

 
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STD test options
Chlamydia test:
£39.99
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Gonnorhea test:
£39.99
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Combined test:
£65.00
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HIV Saliva test:
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Men Only test:
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More information about Sexual health tests

How do I prevent Chlamydia?
Using condoms will prevent many cases of Chlamydia. If you wanted to reduce the risks further, you would have to use condoms for oral sex.

Researchers found that more gay men had rectal infection with Chlamydia than had urethral (penile) Chlamydia or rectal gonorrhoea. Furthermore, the majority of rectal Chlamydia infections were asymptomatic (did not produce symptoms) and would therefore have been missed without routine testing.

Researchers have also found that over a third of the men with rectal Chlamydia were HIV-positive. So again, its best to get tested and be sure, than not know.

If Chlamydia is left untreated, the infection can spread from the penis to the prostate gland, testicles and other parts of the body, which can become tender and inflamed (swollen).

 

How is Chlamydia treated?
Chlamydia is usually treatable with antibiotics. If you have Chlamydia you should inform your recent sexual partners. It's important that you tell any regular partner so that they can get tested and treated too. You then need to avoid sex with them until the treatment has taken effect (usually a couple of weeks) as it's common for people to pass it back and forth to each other. If this happens you'll need treatment again.

 

Which sexual partners should I inform if I've been diagnosed with Chlamydia?

  1. If you have symptoms, you should inform anyone you've had sex with up to four weeks before the symptoms started.
  2. If you don't have any symptoms, you should inform anyone you've had sex with in the last six months, or your last sexual partner if it was longer than six months.

 

What is Gonnorhea and how do people catch it?
Gonorrhoea, or 'the clap', is a bacterial infection of the urethra, rectum, throat or eyes. It can be passed on by sexual activity (oral and anal) without a condom. Rates of gonorrhoea amongst gay men had remained fairly steady over the last ten years but increased dramatically in 2010, when just under 5,000 gay men were treated for gonorrhoea at sexual health clinics in the UK.

 

How do I prevent Gonnorhea?
The more men you have sex with, the more likely you are to get an STI (sexually transmitted infection), including Gonorrhoea. Using condoms will prevent many cases of Gonorrhoea.

 

How do I know I've got Gonnorhea?
It is important to note that sometimes there are no symptoms at all so it is always wise to get tested if you are sexually active. However, noticeable symptoms can include a white or greenish pus discharge from your penis and a burning sensation when you pass urine or ejaculate. An infection in your anus may be noticeable by a yellowish discharge, mild diarrhoea, or itching and pain when you evacuate your bowels. An infection in your mouth can result in a sore throat.

Some symptoms include:

  • An unusual discharge from the tip of the penis, which may be white, yellow or green
  • Pain or a burning sensation when urinating
  • Swelling of the foreskin
  • Pain or tenderness in the testicles or prostate gland (this is rare)

 

How is Gonnorhea treated?
Gonorrhoea is treatable with antibiotics and is completely curable. In some cases, untreated gonorrhoea can spread to the prostate gland and testicles, which may lead to infertility. In the worst case scenario, it could also spread throughout your body causing inflammation of the joints and a widespread blood infection, which can, in rare cases, be fatal.

If you have gonorrhoea you should inform your recent sexual partners. It's important that you tell any regular partner so that they can get tested and treated too. You then need to avoid sex with them until the treatment has taken effect (usually a couple of weeks) as it's common for people to pass it back and forth to each other. If this happens you'll need treatment again.

 

Drug resistant Gonorrhea
Gonorrhoea is treatable with antibiotics and is completely curable. In some cases, untreated gonorrhoea can spread to the prostate gland and testicles, which may lead to infertility. In the worst case scenario, it could also spread throughout your body causing inflammation of the joints and a widespread blood infection, which can, in rare cases, be fatal.

If you have gonorrhoea you should inform your recent sexual partners. It's important that you tell any regular partner so that they can get tested and treated too. You then need to avoid sex with them until the treatment has taken effect (usually a couple of weeks) as it's common for people to pass it back and forth to each other. If this happens you'll need treatment again.

 

How is Gonnorhea treated?
The important thing is to know that in the UK Gonorrhoea can still be cured by antibiotics. But gonorrhoea is changing (although the symptoms remain the same) and the antibiotics used to treat it are getting less effective. For this reason, doctors now need to give higher doses and this means that a pill on its own is not enough. The drug must now be given as an injection into the buttock. A second, different antibiotic is also given as a tablet to increase the chance that treatment works. Because of the possibility of drug resistant gonorrhoea, clinics now call you back to test that your treatment has worked (until recently they would often give one pill and not ask you to return to the clinic). Some experts believe that within a few years treating gonorrhoea will be difficult or no longer possible around the world, including in the UK. As such, here at Convenience Medical, should you test positive for Gonnorhea, we will advise you of your nearest GUM clinic as we cannot send needle injections in the post.

Bacteria (like gonorrhoea) can be killed by antibiotics but often they grow resistant to these drugs. With gonorrhoea this has happened many times over past decades. One type of antibiotic gradually stops being effective and a new antibiotic takes its place, until the bacteria develops resistance to it too, and a new drug is needed, and so it goes on. Unfortunately, there are no new anti-biotic treatments for gonnorhea in the pipeline.

Unfortunately there are no new types of antibiotic against gonorrhoea on the horizon. Unless new ones are created (and none are in the pipeline) we will have no effective treatments once the current antibiotics stop working.

 

Which sexual partners should I inform if I've been diagnosed with Gonorrhoea?

  1. If you have urethral symptoms (symptoms in your penis), you should inform anyone you've had sex with up to two weeks before the symptoms started.
  2. If you don't have any symptoms, you should inform anyone you've had sex with up to three months before you were diagnosed with the infection, or your most recent sexual partner if it was longer than three months


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